And He said to them, "But now, whoever has a money belt is to take it along, likewise also a bag, and whoever has no sword is to sell his coat and buy one. (2022)

Then said he unto them, But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip: and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one.

EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(36) He that hath a purse, let him take it.—The word for “purse” is the same as in Luke 10:4, where see Note. On “scrip,” see Note on Matthew 10:10. If the words had stopped short of the “sword,” we could have received their literal meaning without difficulty. They would have seemed to counsel the prudence which provides for want, instead of a simple trust, as before, in the providence of God, and so would have sanctioned all equitable forms of Church organisation and endowment. The mention of the “sword,” however, introduces a new element of thought. Our Lord’s words to Peter (Matthew 26:52) show that the disciples were not meant to use it in His defence. It is not likely that He would teach them to use it in their own, as they preached the gospel of the Kingdom. True teachers felt afterwards that the weapons of their warfare were not carnal (2Corinthians 10:4). What follows supplies a probable explanation. The Master knew that two of the disciples (Peter and another) had brought swords with them, and with that acceptance of the thoughts of others which we have so often traced, He sadly, and yet, as it were, with the gentle sympathy with which a man speaks to those who are children in age or character, conveyed His warnings in the form which met their fears and hopes. If they meant to trust in swords, a time was coming when they would sorely need them.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

22:21-38 How unbecoming is the worldly ambition of being the greatest, to the character of a follower of Jesus, who took upon him the form of a servant, and humbled himself to the death of the cross! In the way to eternal happiness, we must expect to be assaulted and sifted by Satan. If he cannot destroy, he will try to disgrace or distress us. Nothing more certainly forebodes a fall, in a professed follower of Christ, than self-confidence, with disregard to warnings, and contempt of danger. Unless we watch and pray always, we may be drawn in the course of the day into those sins which we were in the morning most resolved against. If believers were left to themselves, they would fall; but they are kept by the power of God, and the prayer of Christ. Our Lord gave notice of a very great change of circumstances now approaching. The disciples must not expect that their friends would be kind to them as they had been. Therefore, he that has a purse, let him take it, for he may need it. They must now expect that their enemies would be more fierce than they had been, and they would need weapons. At the time the apostles understood Christ to mean real weapons, but he spake only of the weapons of the spiritual warfare. The sword of the Spirit is the sword with which the disciples of Christ must furnish themselves.

Barnes' Notes on the Bible

But now - The Saviour says the times are changed. "Before," he sent them out only for a little time. They were in their own country. Their journeys would be short, and there was no need that they should make preparation for a long absence, or for encountering great dangers. But "now" they were to go into the wide world, among strangers, trials, dangers, and wants. And as the time was near; as he was about to die; as these dangers pressed on, it was proper that they should make provision for what was before them.

A purse - See the notes at Matthew 10:9. He intimates that they should "now" take money, as it would be necessary to provide for their wants in traveling.

Scrip - See the notes at Matthew 10:10.

And he that hath no sword - There has been much difficulty in understanding why Jesus directed his disciples to arm themselves, as if it was his purpose to make a defense. It is certain that the spirit of his religion is against the use of the sword, and that it was not his purpose to defend himself against Judas. But it should be remembered that these directions about the purse, the scrip, and the sword were not made with reference to his "being taken" in the garden, but with reference "to their future life." The time of the trial in Gethsemane was just at hand; nor was there "time" then, if no other reason existed, to go and make the purchase. It altogether refers to their future life. They were going into the midst of dangers. The country was infested with robbers and wild beasts. It was customary to go armed. He tells them of those dangers - of the necessity of being prepared in the usual way to meet them. This, then, is not to be considered as a specific, positive "command" to procure a sword, but an intimation that great dangers were before them; that their manner of life would be changed, and that they would need the provisions "appropriate to that kind of life." The "common" preparation for that manner of life consisted in money, provisions, and arms; and he foretells them of that manner of life by giving them directions commonly understood to be appropriate to it. It amounts, then, to a "prediction" that they would soon leave the places which they had been accustomed to, and go into scenes of poverty, want, and danger, where they would feel the necessity of money, provisions, and the means of defense. All, therefore, that the passage justifies is:

1. That it is proper for people to provide beforehand for their wants, and for ministers and missionaries as well as any others.

2. That self-defense is lawful.

Men encompassed with danger may lawfully "defend" their lives. It does not prove that it is lawful to make "offensive" war on a nation or an individual.

Let him sell his garment - His "mantle" or his outer garment. See the notes at Matthew 5:40. The meaning is, let him procure one at any expense, even if he is obliged to sell his clothes for it intimating that the danger would be very great and pressing.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

35-38. But now—that you are going forth not as before on a temporary mission, provided for without purse or scrip, but into scenes of continued and severe trial, your methods must be different; for purse and scrip will now be needed for support, and the usual means of defense.

Matthew Poole's Commentary

See Poole on "Luke 22:35"

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Then said he unto them,.... That is, Jesus said unto them, as the Persic version expresses it:

but now he that hath a purse let him take it, and likewise his scrip; signifying hereby, that from this time forward, immediately after his departure from them, after his death, resurrection, and ascension, when they should be sent into all the world to preach the Gospel, it would be otherwise with them than before; that they should be reduced to great penury and distress, should neither have food, nor money to buy any with; and that they should suffer hunger, and thirst, and nakedness, and have no certain dwellingplace, as was their case; see 1 Corinthians 4:11 and that they would not be received, and entertained in the manner they had been; and therefore it would be advisable, if they had any provisions, to take them with them in their scrips; or if they had any money, to carry it with them in their purses; for glad would they be to provide themselves with necessaries at any rate:

and he that hath no sword; the word "sword" is not in this clause, but in the next; it is only in the original, "he that hath not"; which, at first sight; looks as if the sense was, he that hath not a purse, or a scrip, to sell, and buy a sword with, let him sell his garment, and buy one: but, as De Dieu observes, the phrase, "he that hath not", is the same with "he that has nothing"; who is a poor man, and has no money to buy a sword with, let him part with his garment, which rich men, who had money, had no need to do; though the Syriac, Persic, and Arabic versions put the word sword, in both clauses;

he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment and buy a sword; that is, if he could get one no other way. Christ here uses the common dialect of the nation, as Dr. Lightfoot observes. So on the feast of dedication of the temple,

"if a man had not any thing to eat, but what he had by alms, he must beg, or , "sell his garment", and take oil, and lamps, and light them (u).''

These words of Christ are not to be understood literally, that he would have his disciples furnish themselves with swords at any rate, since he would never have said, as he afterwards does, that two were sufficient; which could not be enough for eleven men; or have forbid Peter the use of one, as he did in a very little time after this: but his meaning is, that wherever they came, and a door was opened for the preaching of the Gospel, they would have many adversaries, and these powerful, and would be used with great violence, and be followed with rage and persecution; so that they might seem to stand in need of swords to defend them: the phrase is expressive of the danger they would be exposed to, and of their need of protection; and therefore it was wrong in them to be disputing and quarrelling about superiority, or looking out for, and expecting temporal pomp and grandeur, when this would be their forlorn, destitute, and afflicted condition; and they would quickly see the affliction and distress begin in himself. In "seven" ancient copies of Beza's, it is read in the future tense, "he shall take, he shall sell, he shall buy".

(u) Maimon. Hilch. Megilla Uchanucha, c. 4. sect. 12.

Geneva Study Bible

{m} Then said he unto them, But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip: and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one.

(m) He says all this using an allegory, as if he said, O my friends and fellow soldiers, you have lived until now in relative peace: but now there is at hand a most severe battle to be fought, and you must therefore lay all other things aside and think about dressing yourselves in armour. And what this armour is, is shown by his own example, when he prayed afterward in the garden and reproved Peter for striking with the sword.

EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)

Luke 22:36. ἀλλὰ νῦν, but now, suggesting an emphatic contrast between past and present, or near future.—ἀράτω, lift it: if he has a purse let him carry it, it will be needed, either to buy a sword or, more generally, to provide for himself; he is going now not on a peaceful mission in connection with which he may expect friendly reception and hospitality, but on a campaign in an enemy’s country.—ὁ μὴ ἔχων, he who has not; either purse and scrip, or, with reference to what follows, he who hath not already such a thing as a sword let him by all means get one.—πωλησάτω τὸ ἱμάτιον, let him sell his upper garment, however indispensable for clothing by day and by night. A sword the one thing needful. This is a realistic speech true to the manner of Jesus and, what is rare in Lk., given without toning down, a genuine logion without doubt.

Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

36. But now] This was an intimation of their totally changed relation to the world. There was no spontaneous hospitality, no peaceful acceptance, no honoured security, to be looked for now.he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one] Rather, lie that hath not (either purse or scrip to buy a sword with), let him, &c. Of course the expression was not meant to be taken with unintelligent literalness. It was in accordance with that kind metaphorical method of expression which our blessed Lord adopted that His words might never be forgotten. It was to warn them of days of hatred and opposition in which self-defence might become a daily necessity, though not aggression. To infer that the latter is implied has been one of the fatal errors which arise from attributing infallibility to wrong inferences from a superstitious letter-worship.

Bengel's Gnomen

Luke 22:36. [Ἀλλὰ νῦν, but now) When Jesus (the Master) committed Himself as an evil-doer to the hands of men, it was not suitable (seasonable) to supply the disciples with an extraordinary safeguard against the world. For that very reason He permits them to avail themselves of the ordinary helps which minister to the supply of food and to self-defence: and accordingly He informs them of the fact at this time, which was exactly the right time fur doing so.—V. g.]—πήραν, wallet) viz. He that hath a wallet, let him take it. That is to say, no one will be a friend to you, many will be enemies.—ὁ μὴ ἔχων) He who hath not, viz. money [not as Engl. Vers. “He who hath no sword”], wherewith to buy.—τὸ ἱμάτιον, garment) which is more necessary than a purse.—ἀγοράσει, shall buy) See Appar. Crit. Ed. ii. on this passage.[241] The Consequent is put for the Antecedent. That is to say, Ye shall find men at the present time, not only not inclined to confer benefits on you, but altogether hostile in their behaviour towards you. It was for this reason that the Apostles, from this time even up to the day of Pentecost, kept themselves not only as private indivduals, but sometimes shut up in their respective homes: John 16:32 [“Ye shall be scattered every one to his own”]; Luke 19:27; Luke 20:10; Luke 20:19 [“The doors were shut, where the disciples were assembled, for fear of the Jews”].—[μάχαιραν, a sword) not that they might kill any one, but that they might restrain the sword of others.—V. g.][241] D reads ἄρειπωλήσαιἀγοράσει (so d); but ABQ Orig. and Rec. Text, ἀράτωπωλησάτωἀγορασάτω: abc, “tollat, vendat, emat.”—E. and T.Luke 22:36

Vincent's Word Studies

He that hath no sword, etc

But sword is not governed by hath. It is too far off in the sentence. The meaning is, he that hath not purse or scrip (and is therefore penniless), let him sell his garment and buy a sword. So Wyc.

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FAQs

What is the meaning of Luke 22 36? ›

Fulfillment of prophecy interpretation

Christian anarchist Jacques Ellul and Christian pacifist John Howard Yoder do not believe Luke 22:36 overturns the many times Jesus urged his followers to turn the other cheek and not resist evil when confronted by violence during his Sermon on the Mount and years of ministry.

Did Jesus say if you don't have a sword? ›

Let the one whom has no sword sell his cloak and buy one,” Jesus said to his disciples during their last meal together before Jesus was arrested and executed.

Who said he who lives by the sword dies by the sword? ›

"Put your sword back in its place", Jesus said to him, "for all who draw the sword will die by the sword". The saying "all they that take the sword shall perish with the sword" is only found in the Gospel of Matthew and not in any of the other gospels.

What is cloak in the Bible? ›

In biblical days, being blind was often seen as a curse. There was really no way to support yourself financially, so beggars were given cloaks, which gave them permission to beg. Beggars were defined as such by the cloak they wore.

What is the spiritual meaning of a sword? ›

The sword symbolizes power, protection, authority, strength, and courage; metaphysically, it represents discrimination and the penetrating power of the intellect.

What is sharper than a two edged sword? ›

In Hebrews 4:12, God's word is said to be “quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword.” The Greek word for quick means “alive, living, lively.” The Greek word for powerful means “full of energy, energized, active, effective.”

What is the sword of the spirit in the Bible? ›

The sixth piece of armor that Paul discusses in Ephesians 6 is the sword of the spirit, which represents the Word of God. For a Roman soldier, the sword served as an offensive weapon against enemies. When sharpened, the sword could pierce through just about anything, making it a very dangerous tool.

What does it mean to put on the armor of God? ›

The armor of God represents the defense we must take in our spiritual lives. The Bible tells us that we are fighting a war against Satan, who seeks to destroy us. Therefore, we must take action and put on God's armor. As Christians, it is important for us to understand the severity of this battle.

What did Jesus say about war? ›

In his prophecies of the Last Things, Jesus spoke of the wars of the future. He said that nation would rise against nation and kingdom against kingdom, that wars and rumours of wars would be heard of, that Judaea would be devastated, Jerusalem besieged and taken by the gentiles, and the Temple defiled and destroyed.

Is Jesus a carpenter? ›

Gallaty, pastor of Long Hollow Baptist Church in Nashville, Tennessee, says the main support for the traditional position are Mark 6:3 and Matthew 13:55. In those verses, Jesus and Joseph are called tektōn, which is most frequently rendered “carpenter” by Bible translators.

What is living by the gun? ›

A man returns from the bad blood and hard luck roads of redemption to his family homestead following his brother's death setting off his niece's quest for revenge.

What does the Bible say about turning the other cheek? ›

Matt. 5 Verses 38 to 48

[39] But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also. [40] And if any man will sue thee at the law, and take away thy coat, let him have thy cloke also.

What does cloak mean spiritually? ›

The "cloak" is traditionally known as a spiritual symbol of creating sacred space for inner transformation.

What was the purpose of a cloak? ›

A cloak is a type of loose garment worn over clothing, mostly but not always as outerwear for outdoor wear, serving the same purpose as an overcoat, protecting the wearer from the weather. It may form part of a uniform. Cloaks have been and are worn in countless societies.

What is a woman's cloak? ›

As a noun, a cloak is usually a loose piece of clothing that you wear over your other clothes, like a cape or a gown. It especially refers to an outer garment that you might wear while traveling in order to protect your outfit or to conceal your identity. As a verb, to cloak is to conceal or hide something.

What is a dragon a symbol of? ›

The dragon is a symbol of evil, in both the chivalric and Christian traditions. In the Orient, it symbolizes supernatural power, wisdom, strength, and hidden knowledge. In most traditions, it is the embodiment of chaos and untamed nature.

What does a butterfly symbolize? ›

In its metamorphosis from the common, colorless caterpillar to the exquisite winged creature of delicate beauty, the butterfly has become a metaphor for transformation and hope; across cultures, it has become a symbol for rebirth and resurrection, for the triumph of the spirit and the soul over the physical prison, the ...

What does a sword symbolize in Christianity? ›

A sword in Christianity also quite often symbolizes the power and might of the Lord. It also (symbolically!) separates good from evil. The necessary decisions for this act then symbolizes justice.

What is sharper than a sword? ›

“For the word of God is alive and powerful. It is sharper than the sharpest two-edged sword, cutting between soul and spirit, between joint and marrow. It exposes our innermost thoughts and desires. Nothing in all creation is hidden from God.

What does Hebrews 4 12 teach us? ›

“Let us, therefore, make every effort to enter that rest, so that no one will fall by following their example of disobedience.”

How sharp is the word of God? ›

Our devotion today comes from Hebrews 4:12. For the word of God is quick and powerful and sharper than any two edged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit and of the joints and marrow and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart.

What is the powerful weapon in the Bible? ›

Hebrews 4:12 says “For the word of God is living and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword.” Sounds like a pretty powerful weapon, doesn't it? We, as believers, need to utilize this amazing weapon we have been given.

What are the 7 Armour of God? ›

These pieces are described in Ephesians as follows: loins girt with truth (belt of truth), breastplate of righteousness, shoes with the preparation of the gospel of peace (peace), shield of faith, helmet of salvation, and the sword of the spirit/word of God.

What are the offensive weapons in the armor of God? ›

It's not, “Put on the full armor of God, so that when the day of evil comes, you may be able to stand your ground” (Ephesians 6:13, NIV†). The American way is to grab a howitzer of holiness, a grenade launcher of grace, and an M-16 of mercy as the weapons for God's warriors so that we can be victorious over evil.

How do I pray for the full armor of God? ›

Thank you God for granting me Your armor from heaven. God, You have said that this armor is not pretend stuff, but is Your real armor. I know there is power in putting on Your mighty armor. Help me stand strong today and please encourage my heart so that I'm fit for battle.

What does it mean praying in the Spirit? ›

To pray “in the Holy Spirit,” then is to pray with the conscious awareness of God's presence surrounding us and sanctifying both us and our prayer.

How do I put on the whole armor of God? ›

How to Put On the Armor of God | Devotional by Tony Evans - YouTube

What does the Bible say about tattoos? ›

Today they're common everywhere from Maori communities in New Zealand to office parks in Ohio. But in the ancient Middle East, the writers of the Hebrew Bible forbade tattooing. Per Leviticus 19:28, “You shall not make gashes in your flesh for the dead, or incise any marks on yourselves.”

Why did God allow war in the Old Testament? ›

Even when God's own people resort to idolatry, he enacts such warfare against them to purge the land and his people of their idolatrous ways (see Lamentations 2). Still it should be remembered that such warfare remains a non-repeatable action within the grand narrative of God's redemption.

Does God want war? ›

The Lord has commanded His people to “renounce war and proclaim peace” (D&C 98:16).

Is Jesus a vegetarian? ›

Many biblical scholars believe that Jesus was a vegetarian. Jesus' message is one of love and compassion, and there is nothing loving or compassionate about factory farms and slaughterhouses, where billions of animals live miserable lives and die violent, bloody deaths.

What country did Jesus live in? ›

Nazareth. The Gospels say that although Jesus was born in Bethlehem, he spent much of his early life in Nazareth, in northern Israel.

What was the first language Jesus spoke? ›

Most religious scholars and historians agree with Pope Francis that the historical Jesus principally spoke a Galilean dialect of Aramaic. Through trade, invasions and conquest, the Aramaic language had spread far afield by the 7th century B.C., and would become the lingua franca in much of the Middle East.

What does God say about An eye for an eye? ›

But in Matthew (5:38-42) in the New Testament, Jesus repudiates even that notion. "Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth: But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also.

What does God mean by eye for an eye? ›

For example, if a person caused the death of another person, the killer would be put to death. The simplest example is the "eye for an eye" principle. In that case, the rule was that punishment must be exactly equal to the crime.

What does the Bible say about turning your back on someone? ›

One of the chief tenets of Christian ethics is to not strike back against someone who hurts you. The Apostle Paul says in Romans chapter 12, “Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse. Do not repay anyone evil for evil.

Did Peter carry a sword? ›

It is claimed to be the sword with which the Apostle Peter cut off the right ear of the high priest's servant at the time of Jesus' arrest in Gethsemane. The sword is wide-tipped, similar in shape to a dussack or machete.

Who have believed our report KJV? ›

[1] Who hath believed our report? and to whom is the arm of the LORD revealed? [2] For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him.

Why does Paul have a sword? ›

The book carried by Saint Paul represents his epistles in the New Testament of the Bible. The sword is a reminder of the means of his martyrdom – he was beheaded in Rome in 67 AD.

Who helped Jesus carry the cross? ›

Mark 15: 21

They compelled a passer-by, who was coming in from the country, to carry his cross; it was Simon of Cyrene, the father of Alexander and Rufus.

What does Put up your swords mean? ›

When you are tempted to strike out with your own words instead of relying on God's Word, stop! Put up your sword.

What is a good Bible verse for healing? ›

"Heal me, Lord, and I will be healed; save me and I will be saved, for you are the one I praise." "And the people all tried to touch him, because power was coming from him and healing them all." "'But I will restore you to health and heal your wounds,' declares the Lord."

What does Isaiah chapter 53 mean? ›

Isaiah 53 contains a prophecy of the Atonement of Jesus Christ. Isaiah taught that the Savior would be despised and rejected, smitten and afflicted; that He would carry our sorrows; and that He would be wounded for our transgressions.

What is the arm of God? ›

“Behold, the Lord God comes with might, and his arm rules for him.” When the Bible talks about God's right arm, it refers to His powerful, ruling arm—His justice, His holiness, and His strength. God is like that.

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